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Interviewer: Your character shares an instant connection with Thomas, Dylan O’Brien’s character. What was it like the first time you two met?

Kaya: It was crazy. We really did have that. I loved him straight away. He turned up and hadn’t slept. He was on an all-night flight, and he was really polite. We talked, and I really liked him. I could tell straightaway he wasn’t a fame boy, and he was really talented and a cool guy.

diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:

No One Needs to Know by Amanda Grace (Flux)

“A surprisingly sweet take on two girls falling in love and struggling with their feelings, their families, and their baggage, but not with any homophobia. … ‘Wholesome’ is a strange word to describe a YA book that deals with tricky class issues, sexual orientation, mean-girl bullying, and love triangles, but this story earns that description.” — School Library Journal

Blood of My Blood by Barry Lyga (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers)

Book Description: Jazz Dent has been shot and left to die in New York City. His girlfriend Connie is in the clutches of Jazz’s serial killer father, Billy. And his best friend Howie is bleeding to death on the floor of Jazz’s own home in tiny Lobo’s Nod. Somehow, these three must rise above the horrors their lives have become and find a way to come together in pursuit of Billy. But then Jazz crosses a line he’s never crossed before, and soon the entire country is wondering: “Like father, like son?” Who is the true monster?

The chase is on, and beyond Billy there lurks something much, much worse. Prepare to meet…the Crow King.

Hunt for the Bamboo Rat by Graham Salisbury (Wendy Lamb Books)

“Zenji Watanabe is Nisei, an American with Japanese parents, living in Honolulu on the eve of World War II. … This title is a welcome new angle in historical fiction on the Japanese-American experience during the war, and it is based on a true story.” — School Library Journal

Illusions of Fate by Kiersten White (HarperTeen)

“Jessamin Olea earns her way into a boarding school in Albion where she is considered second class by the other students and referred to as ”Island Rat“ because she is from the island of Melie. She spends most of her time studying and alone until she meets Finn, a young lord who belongs to the nobility of Albion. … This well-written historical fantasy has romance, suspense, a fairy-tale feel, and a great ending that will leave readers cheering.” — School Library Journal

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